Press Releases

    GA/DIS/3307
    20 October 2005

    Disarmament Committee Text Calls for Early Entry into Force of Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    Other Drafts Introduced Concern UN Disarmament Research Institute, Asia Regional Centre

    NEW YORK, 19 October (UN Headquarters) -- The General Assembly, convinced that the cessation of nuclear weapons tests was a meaningful step towards achieving nuclear disarmament, would stress the importance and urgency of signature and ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) without delay and without conditions to achieve the Treaty's earliest entry into force, according to one of three draft resolutions introduced today in the First Committee (Disarmament and International Security).

    Stressing that a universal and effectively verifiable nuclear-test-ban Treaty was a fundamental instrument in the nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation field, the Assembly would urge all States, particularly those whose ratification is needed for its entry into force, to accelerate their ratification processes with a view to their earliest successful conclusion.  It would also urge all States to remain seized of the issue at the highest political level.

    In a related provision, the Assembly would urge all States to maintain their moratoriums on nuclear-weapon test explosions or any other nuclear explosions and to refrain from acts that would defeat the Treaty's object and purpose.

    Introducing the revised draft resolution, Mexico's representative said that the text was an important call for the Treaty's entry into force.  It highlighted the importance of the CTBT to the global non-proliferation regime, as that was designed to become a very valuable instrument in preventing the spread, both vertical and horizontal, of nuclear weapons.  Drawing attention to the Treaty's worldwide monitoring mechanism, the text reaffirmed the CTBT as a reliable global mechanism.  He hoped for the draft's broad support.

    The Assembly, in another draft tabled today by France's delegation, would underline the relevant contribution of the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR) to thinking and analysis on international security issues in the current context.  The Assembly would reiterate its conviction that the Institute should continue to conduct independent research on problems relating to disarmament and security and to undertake specialized research requiring a high degree of expertise.  Deeming that the Institute's work was of great importance to the entire international community, France's representative stressed that it should receive sufficient resources to successfully conduct its work.

    Introducing a revised text on the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific, Nepal's speaker said that the Centre, headquartered in Kathmandu, made a significant contribution to building confidence at the regional and subregional levels by constructing dialogue and enhancing transparency. The draft underlined the importance of the "Kathmandu process", as a powerful vehicle for developing region-wide security and disarmament dialogue.  It appealed to Member States to make voluntary contributions -- the Centre's only resources -- to strengthen its programme of activities.

    The Committee opened briefly this morning, before suspending for statements by:  the Chairman of the Conference on Disarmament; the Chairman of the United Nations Disarmament Commission; and the Under-Secretary-General for Disarmament Affairs, Nobuyasu Abe.  When it resumed, it heard the introduction of draft texts.

    The Committee will meet again at 10 a.m. Thursday, 20 October, to continue hearing introductions on draft resolutions and decisions on all disarmament and international security matters.

    Background

    The First Committee (Disarmament and International Security) met this morning to continue hearing introductions of draft resolutions on disarmament and international security matters.

    The meeting opened briefly and was then suspended in order for members to hear statements by the following:  the Chairman of the Conference on Disarmament, Felix Calderon; the Chairman of the United Nations Disarmament Commission, Sylvester Ekundayo Rowe; and the Under-Secretary-General for Disarmament Affairs, Nobuyasu Abe.

    Introduction of Texts

    FRANÇOIS RIVASSEAU (France) introduced a draft resolution on the twenty-fifth anniversary of the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR) (document A/C.1/60/L.2).  He said the international community should be in a position to benefit from the fruit of independent and thorough research on security issues and disarmament and non-proliferation prospects.  The work of UNIDIR constituted a particularly relevant contribution to the analysis of international security issues in the current context.  That work was of great importance to the entire international community.  It was essential that UNIDIR continue to carry out independent research on disarmament and security issues and conduct specialized studies requiring a high degree of expertise.  But, that implied that UNIDIR should receive sufficient resources to successfully conduct that work.  The draft resolution called upon Member States to continue to allocate those voluntary contributions to enable the Institute to pursue its mission.

    LUIS ALFONSO DE ALBA (Mexico) introduced a revised draft resolution on the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) (document A/C.1/60/L.26) and said that it contained changes and updates from last year's resolution.  The last preambular paragraph welcomed the final declarations from the last conference.  The resolution was an important call by the international community for early entry into force of the CTBT and the draft affirmed its importance.  It was designed to become a very valuable instrument.  The treaty had a fundamental role in preventing non-nuclear proliferation, both vertical and horizontal.  It reaffirmed the CTBT as a reliable mechanism at the global level.

    MADHU RAMAN ACHARYA (Nepal) introduced the revised draft resolution on the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Asia and the Pacific (document A/C.1/60/L.32/Rev.1) said that the Centre made a significant contribution by constructing dialogue and enhancing transparency and confidence-building at the regional and subregional levels.  The Centre could contribute to continued dialogue and interaction, not only at the governmental level, but also at the level of civil society, thereby creating greater global understanding of the disarmament and non-proliferation processes.  The Centre, in particular, fostered such dialogue and cooperation, and Nepal was committed to its enhanced and constructive role, as a contribution to peace and disarmament in the region and beyond.

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